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All tracks traditional, except where noted. All arrangements by the various musicians on each track- except Fair Jaime, The Drowsy Sleeper and The Loggers Boast, arranged by Lissa Schneckenburger

For bookings, additional recordings, and more information on the musicians and songs, go to www.lissafiddle.com.

credits

released April 27, 2013

Recorded at Sound Design (Brattleboro VT) by Allan Stockwell. Additional recording at Poet’s Corner (Co. Galway, Ireland) by Leon O’Neill, Frost Studios (Brattleboro VT), and Robot Rodeo (West Newton MA) by Eric Merrill. “Fair Jaime” Recorded live on WVBR's Bound for Glory, Ithaca, NY, April 8th, 2007. Host: Phil Shapiro, Mixed by: Terry Kelleher
Produced by Eric Merrill and Lissa Schneckenburger
Mixed by Matt Beaudoin at Q Division, Somerville MA
Mastered by Jay Frigoletto, Metranome Studio
Graphic Design by Adam Agee
Corey DiMario and Rushad Eggleston appear courtesy of Signature Sounds Records

Lissa plays Bob Childs (2004) and Collin-Mezin (1951) fiddles, Corey DiMario plays basses made by the Upton Bass String Instrument Company

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Lissa Schneckenburger Brattleboro, Vermont

The traditional music of New England can be as warm and comforting as a winter fire or as potent and exhilarating as a summer thunderstorm. Fiddler and singer Lissa Schneckenburger is a master of both moods, a winsome, sweet-voiced singer who brings new life to old ballads and a skillful, dynamic fiddler who captures the driving rhythm and carefree joy of dance tunes old and new. ... more

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Track Name: Fair Maid by the Sea Shore
the fair maid by the sea shore
(words: traditional, music: Lissa S.)
source: “The Maine Woods Songster” edited by Phillips Barry, 1939

There was a fair maiden far crossed in love far crossed in love as it were o
Nothing could she find but to ease her fair mind
Than to stray all along the sea shore, stray all along the sea shore

There was a sea captain a ploughing the deep a ploughing the deep as is were o
Nothing could he find but to ease his sad mind
Than to sail all along the sea shore, sail all along the sea shore

Oh I have got silver and I have got gold and I have got costly wares o
All these I will give to my jolly seamen
If they’ll bring this fair damsel on board, bring this fair damsel on board

With many persuasions she came on board, the captain he welcomed her there o
He welcomed her down to his cabin below
Saying fair thee well sorrow and care, fair thee well sorrow and care.

She sang him a song it was at his request she sang it so sweet and so fair o
She sang it so sweet so neat and complete
That she sang the sea captain to sleep, sang the sea captain to sleep

Then she robbed him of silver she robbed him of gold, she robbed him of costly wares o
And the captain’s broad sword she used for an oar
As she paddled her boat to the shore, paddled her boat to the shore.

Oh were my men sleeping or were my men mad or were my men sunk in despair o
That the lady so gay should thus run away
When the captain he welcomed her there, the captain he welcomed her there.

No your men were not sleeping your men were not mad your men were not sunk in despair o
I deluded your crew and likewise you too
And again I’m a maid on the shore, again I’m a maid on the shore
Track Name: Jam on Gerry's Rock/ Willie's
jam on gerry’s rock/ willie’s
(Lissa S.)
“Willie’s” written for Willie Bain
song source: “Maine Traditional Music, vol 4” produced for Maine Public Radio by Jeff McKeen,
recorded from the singing of Newell Beam in Machias, Maine.

Now come all of you bold shanty boys and listen while I relate
The story of a river man and his untimely fate
The story of a river man who’s heart was true and brave
It was at the jam on Gary’s Rock that he met his watery grave

It was on a Sunday morning, as you shall quickly hear
The logs were piled up mountains high we could not keep them clear
Our foreman said come on brave lads with hearts devoid of fear
And we’ll break the jam on Gary’s Rock and for Adam’s Town we’ll turn

They had not rolled off many when they heard his clear voice say
I’ll have you be on your guards, boys for the jam will soon give way
These words were scarcely spoken when the jam did break and go
And it carried away those six brave lads with their foreman young Monroe

They pulled him from his watery grave, brushed back his raven hair
There’s one fair form among them who’s wails did ring the air
There’s one fair form among them, a girl from Logan’s Town
Who’s wonton cries rang to the skies for her true love that got drowned

They buried him with sorrow deep it was on the month of May
Come all of you bold shanty boys and for your comrade pray
They buried him with sorrow deep it was where the hemlock grow
With the day and date of that sad fate of that shanty boy Monroe
Track Name: Harmony
harmony
(words: Isaac Watts 1707, music: Supply Belcher 1794)
source: “The Norumbega Harmony: Historic and Contemporary Hymn Tunes and Anthems from the New England Singing School Tradition”
University Press of Mississippi 2003

Come let us join our cheerful songs, with angels round the throne
Ten thousand thousand are their tongues but all their joys are one (2x)

Worthy the lamb that died they cry, to be exalted thus
Worthy the lamb our lips reply for he was slain for us (2x)

The whole creation join in one, to bless the sacred name
Of one who sits upon the throne and to adore the lamb (2x)
Track Name: The Lumberman in Town/ Go Ken Go
lumberman in town/ go ken go
(Lissa S)
“Go Ken Go” written for Ken Voorhees
song source: “The Maine Woods Songster” edited by Phillips Barry, 1939

When the lumberman comes down, every pocket bears a crown
And he wanders some pretty girl to find
If she is not too sly with her dark and rolling eye
The lumberman is pleased to his mind (2x)

Then the landlady comes in she is dressed so neat and trim
And she looks just like an evening star
She is ready to wait on him if she finds him in good trim
Chalk him down for two to one at the bar (2x)

The lumberman goes on till his money's spent and gone
And the landlady begins to frown
With her dark and rolling eye this will always be her cry
Lumberman it is time you were gone (2x)

She gives him to understand there’s a boat to be a manned
And away up the river he must go
With good liquor and a song its go hitch your horses on
Bid adieu to the girls of St John (2x)

Then to the woods he’ll go with his heart so full of woe
And he wanders from tree after tree
Till six months have come and past he forgets it all at last
It is time that I should have another spree (2x)
Track Name: The Logger's Boast
the logger’s boast
source: “The Maine Woods Songster” edited by Phillips Barry, 1939

Come all you sons of freedom, throughout the state of Maine
Come all you gallant lumbermen, and listen to my strain,
On the banks of the Penobscot, where the rapid water flows
(Ch)
We’ll range the wild woods over and a lumbering we’ll go
And a lumbering we’ll go
We’ll range the wild woods over and a lumbering we’ll go

When the white frost gilds the valleys and cold congeals the flood
When many men have naught to do to earn their families bread
When the swollen streams are frozen, and the hills are clad with snow
(Ch)

When you pass through the dense city and pity all you meet
To hear their teeth chattering as they hurry down the street
But in red frost proof flannel we’re encased from top to toe
(Ch)

The music of our burnished axe shall make the woods resound
And many a lofty ancient pine will tumble to the ground
But at night around our campfire we’ll sing while rude winds blow
(Ch)

When our youthful days have ended we’ll cease from winter’s toils
And each one through the summer warm will till the virgin soil
We’ve enough to eat to drink to wear, content through life to go
Then we’ll tell our wild adventures and no more a lumbering go
And no more a lumbering go
We’ll tell our wild adventures and no more a lumbering go
Track Name: Lovely Jaime
lovely jamie
source: “The Maine Woods Songster” edited by Phillips Barry, 1939

On last Monday evening as I went to the ball
I met my own Jamie so proper and tall
I asked him to go with me, a piece down the road
I’d show him my father’s garden, and where I abode

There’s a tree in father’s garden lovely Jamie said she
Where young men and maidens they wait upon me
Where young men and maidens are enjoying their rest
Meet me there, lovely Jamie, you’re the boy I love best

My cruel cruel father in ambush did lay
And hearing the words that my Jamie did say
And hearing the words as for my love he did sue
With a pointed weapon he pierced my love through

Oh cruel cruel father, since this is your will
The innocent blood of my Jamie to spill
I’ll go now to his grave where he lies so low
May the heavens shine round him he’s my own darling boy

Oh green grow the rushes and tall grow the trees
And love it is waiting, it waits for you and me
And love it is a hard thing, it conquers the best
In heaven I hope to meet him, it’s there I’ll find rest.
Track Name: Young Charlotte
young charlotte
(words: traditional/Lissa S, music: traditional/Lissa S.)
source: "The Maine Woods Songster" edited by Phillips Barry, 1939

In a village fifteen miles from home, there’s a merry ball tonight
Although the air is freezing cold our hearts are warm and light
Long and anxiously she watched till a well-known voice she hears
And driving up to the cottage door young Charles Wesley appears

Why Charlotte dear her mother says this blanket around you fold
It is a dreadful night you know you’ll take your death of cold
"Oh no oh no," young Charlotte says and she laughed like a gypsy queen
To ride in blankets muffled up I never would be seen

(Ch)
And the wind blows cruel, and the wind blows free
Bring my love back to me

There’s music in the sound of bells as over the hills we go
What a crackling noise the runners make as they bite the frozen snow
With faces muffled silently for five long miles they rode
Until at length with a frozen word young Charles the silence broke

Such a night as this I never knew my reins I scarce can hold
Young Charlotte says with a feeble voice I feel exceeding cold
He cracks his whip he urged his steed much faster than before
Until at length five more long miles in silence they rode over

(Ch)

Young Charles he says I feel the air a gathering on my brow
Young Charlotte says with a weaker voice I’m growing warmer now
They rode over the mountain side and through the cold starlight
Until they entered the village and the ball room came in sight

Driving up young Charles jumps out and gives his hand to her
Why sit you there like a monument that has no power to stir
He called her once he called her twice but she uttered not a word
He called her for her hand again but still she never stirred

(Ch)

He tore the mantle from her brow and the cold stars on her shone
And quickly in the lighted room her helpless form was borne
They tried all means were in their power her life to restore
But Charlotte was a frozen corpse again to speak no more

They bore her out into the sleigh and Charles with her rode home
And when they reached her cottage door oh how her parents mourned
They mourned the loss of their daughter dear and Charles mourned for his bride
Until at length his heart did break and they slumber side by side

(Ch)

And the wind blows cruel, and the wind blows free
Bring my love back to me
And the sun will set, and the snow will fall
Falling down upon us all
Track Name: Little Musgrove and Lady Barnswell
little musgrove and lady barnswell
source: “British Ballads From Maine: The Development of Popular Songs with Texts and Airs” by Phillips Barry, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm, and Mary Winslow Smyth, 1929

There were nine ladies of the East
Assembled at the ball
The first to come in was Lord Barnswell’s Lady
The fairest of them all
She cast her eyes on Little Musgrove
And Little Musgrove on she
How much would you take you Little Musgrove
To tarry all night with me

To tarry all night with you fair lady
Would cause no end of war
I know you are Lord Barnswell’s lady
By the gold rings you wear
So what if I am Lord Barnswell’s lady
This night I mean to beguile
For he is away to fair old England
He won’t be back for a while

What is it that I hear
Says Little Musgrove says he
No no it is but the wind
As it stirs the leaves on the tree
Lie still lie still you Little Musgrove
And shield me from the cold
It’s not it’s not but a little shepherd
As he drives his sheep to the fold

Then up came Barnswell and his men
And pounded at the ring
Rise up rise up you Little Musgrove
Rise up and let me in
He’s taken off the coverlet
He’s taken off the sheets
Oh now oh now my Little Musgrove
Do you find my lady sweet

Rise up rise up you Little Musgrove
And you your clothes put on
For it should never be said of Barnswell
That he killed a naked man
The very first blow that Musgrove gave
He wounded Lord Barnswell sore
The very first blow that Lord Barnswell gave
And Little Musgrove was no more

She lifted up his dying head
And kissed him from cheek to chin
I’d rather have you oh Little Musgrove
Than Banswell and all his kin
He’s turned around to his fair lady
And stabbed her to the heart
Since in this life you have lovers been
In death you shall not part
Track Name: The Old Begger Man
the old beggar man
source: “British Ballads From Maine: The Development of Popular Songs with Texts and Airs” by Phillips Barry, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm, and Mary Winslow Smyth, 1929

He gave his love a gay gold watch that she might rule in her own country
She gave him a gay gold ring, and the virtue of that ring was above all things

If this ring is bright true know your love is true to you
But if this ring is pale and wan your true love is in love with another one

He set sail and off went he until he came to strange country
He looked at the ring it was pale and wan, his true love was in love with another one

So he set sail and back came he until he came to his own country
And as he was riding along the plain who should he meet but an old beggar man

You lend me your begging rig that begging rig it must go on
So come tell me as fast as you can what’s to be done with the begging rig

You may beg from pitt you may beg from paul beg from the highest to the lowest of them all
But from them all you need take none until you come to the bride’s own hand

She came trembling down the stairs rings on her fingers and gold in her hair
A glass of wine all in her hand which she gave to the old beggar man

He took the glass and drank the wine and in the glass he slipped the ring
Oh where got you this by sea or by land, or did you get it off of a drowned one’s hand

I did not get it by sea or land I did not get it off a drowned one’s hand
I got it in my courting gay, and gave it to my love on her wedding day

Rings from her fingers she did pull off gold from her hair she did let fall
I’ll go with you forever more and beg for my bread from door to door

Between the kitchen and the hall the begging rig he did let fall
Shining in gold amongst them all and he was the fairest in the hall
Track Name: The Drowsy Sleeper
the drowsy sleeper
source: “The Maine Woods Songster” edited by Phillips Barry, 1939

Arise arise you drowsy sleeper, arise arise it’s almost day
There’s someone at your bedroom window a-mourning there so bitterly

Oh who is at my bedroom window a-mourning there so bitterly
Tis I tis I your own true loved one, the boy you always loved the best

Oh Mary dear go ask your father if you my wedded bride shall be
If he says no, love come and tell me and I’ll no longer trouble thee

Oh Willie dear I dare not ask him for he lies in his bed at rest
And by his side a silver dagger to pierce the heart that I love best

Oh Mary dear go ask your mother if you my wedded bride shall be
If she says no, love come and tell me and I’ll no longer trouble thee

Oh Willie dear I need not ask her for she is bound to set us free
So Willie dear go court some other she whispered softly unto me

Oh I can climb the highest tree love and I can rob the eagle’s nest
And I can court the prettiest fair maid but not the one that I love best